Thursday, September 2, 2010

Friday Feature: Cedar Creek Treasures, Grace Hill Gifts, and Lace Continued

This being the final installment of the lace theme, I thought maybe I should introduce several different ways fiber lace is made. The most fantastic method I have encountered is bobbin lacemaking. Artisans of this type use long wooden bobbins wound with thread which they cross and wind according to a printed pattern on a base. The example below is from Fine Threads (http://www.finethreads-vermontlace.com).


I love fiber and all fiber crafts, but I can't even imagine tackling bobbin lacemaking.

Another type of lace is one that is crocheted using fine cotton floss and a small crochet hook. The single and double crochet stitches build upon one another to make a beautiful piece of lace.

Cedar Creek Treasures' (http://www.etsy.com/shop/cedarcreektreasures) owner, Linda, decorates her shop of inspirational plaques and door decor with delicate crocheted doilies. She obviously understands the elegance inherent in lace as shown by a shop photo of her lovely Mother Theresa wall hanging.

Vintage Look Inspirational Plaque with Quote from Mother Teresa

Last but not least in my estimation is knitted lace. Sitting peacefully with beautiful yarn following a rhythmic pattern of knits, purls, and yarn-overs is one of the most pleasing things I can do. The baby's Baptismal bonnet is just such knitted lace with a crocheted ruffle:

white hand knitted baptismal bonnet three to six months

For a finer example of knitted lace, I have used crochet cotton in cream to knit lace bookmarks. These can be found at my other shop Fiberfads! where my net proceeds are donated to a prolife woman's shelter.

hand knitted lace bookmark with yarn charm





Icing and a pastry bag, paper and scissors, manufactured lace and a sewing machine, crochet cotton and a crochet hook, yarn and knitting needles...it doesn't matter how you make lace, just do it!

4 comments:

  1. Thank you Ann and the Guild for providing a place to blog about what we love best...our Catholic faith and our art.

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  2. It is fascinating how intricate the lace-making process is! Thanks for sharing this!!

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  3. Thank you Adele for recognizing my shop in such a creative way! You truly have a gift for blogging!

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